The Tree of Life (2011) Filming Locations

The most impactful movie of my life is The Tree of Life (2011) directed by Terrence Malick. In March of 2019, we visited many of the filming locations in Texas of this film that starred Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, and Sean Penn. Locations in Texas include Smithville, La Grange, and Austin. The residents of Smithville were very kind and welcoming which made our visit that much more memorable.

Scroll the Pinterest board below or click to view photos of filming locations that I took in March of 2019 that include screenshots from The Tree of Life (2011) film.

The most impactful movie of my life is The Tree of Life (2011) directed by Terrence Malick. In March of 2019, we visited many of the filming locations in Texas of this film that starred Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, and Sean Penn. Locations in Texas include Smithville, La Grange, and Austin. The residents of Smithville were very kind and welcoming which made our visit that much more memorable.

Lists of Filming Locations

Movie-locations.com – The Tree of Life (2011)

IMDB – The Tree of Life (2011) Film Locations

Smithville, Texas – Movie Sights

Map of Filming Locations – Smithville, Texas

The Tree of Life – Reflections — The Bookshop Barista

Terrence Malick is no ordinary filmmaker, nor is The Tree of Life a typical drama. (Is it a drama?) It’s hard to put the film’s plot into a box, but that being said I’ll try my best before I go into my thoughts. Simply, The Tree of Life is the story of a man looking back on his […]

The Tree of Life – Reflections — The Bookshop Barista

Criterion’s ‘The Tree of Life’ Is Not a Director’s Cut, but a New Movie From Terrence Malick — IndieWire

There is so much to enjoy in the Criterion version.

Malick says that the new, 188-minute edit of his 2011 drama starring Brad Pitt is another version altogether.

Criterion’s ‘The Tree of Life’ Is Not a Director’s Cut, but a New Movie From Terrence Malick — IndieWire

Fiona Shaw on Killing Eve, Harry Potter, and “walking into people’s imaginations”

https://tv.avclub.com/fiona-shaw-on-killing-eve-harry-potter-and-walking-i-1833946368

The Tree Of Life (2011)—“Grandmother”

AVC: Going back to that notion that a film performance is what the editor has decided to keep, you’re not onscreen for very much of The Tree Of Life, but you must’ve shot more than what ended up in the final cut.

FS: I went out to stay with them all in a place called Smithville, in Texas. It’s an amazing town with a big huge water tank—one of those gorgeous, old American Midwest water tanks right as you enter the town, with “Smithville” written on it. And it’s the first town I ever went to where I saw literally two cowboys walking down the street. And I thought, “My God, I could be in 1870 here.”

And Terry Malick is just the most delightful person you could meet. He had come to BAM in Brooklyn—what was I performing? I think I was doing Happy Days, and he came to see Happy Days, and we had lunch. He doesn’t often come to New York, he said, and we had a lovely lunch. So I felt that I knew him by the time I went down to work with him, and he’d written various things, and he asked me to write various things, and then he would film it in a million different locations. He’d film the same scene in the sitting room, in the street, down the road. He’d say, “Where would you like to film it now?” And I’d think, “What?” He’s looking for the music of the scene, isn’t he? He’s not looking for the scene of the scene or the plot of the scene.

So I filmed a lot, and at one point, about a year later, Sara [Green], the producer, said to me, “You know, your voiceover is very much the leading voice of the film.” By the time the film came out, I was almost out of it. And that tells you everything about process. [Malick] takes a world and then he chips away at it bit by bit by bit by bit. So you have no idea whether any of it is left. But I didn’t mind at all because to be even around him—you couldn’t write those scenes and do them in one go. You have to find a process by which to find them. And he did that.

But you’re dead right: I did an enormous amount of filming, and very little of it [Laughs.] was left, but I’m trying not to take it as a criticism.

The Tree of Life ranks 7th on BBC’s 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20160819-the-21st-centurys-100-greatest-films

In August of 2016, the BBC released their rankings for the 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century (to include the year 2000). Film critics from the six inhabited continents, 177 critics in all, submitted their rankings that were compiled into the BBC’s official list.

The Tree of Life finds itself 7th in the rankings.

Below is a list of the top ten.

10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)
7. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater, 2014)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)
2. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)