BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN GIVES LOVE TO … AS HE MAKES HIS OWN DIRECTORIAL DEBUT

From the Westerns of John Ford to the sprawling meditative works of Terrence Malick, the musician doesn’t hold back when it comes to his own cinematic influences.

“The Grapes of Wrath had a huge influence on me when I saw it – just the imagery and the story it was telling,” he said. “Of course, The Searchers and all the Westerns, which I had seen as a kid, but never really absorbed. Also, the noir stuff, like Out of the Past with Robert Mitchum… that was a huge film for me. And then there were more modern things, like Martin Scorsese’s pictures – but also I remember at the time I wrote ‘Nebraska,’ I had seen a Terrence Malick picture for the first time. [His films] are meditative; lots of voiceover… Days of Heaven, Tree of Life. The soundscape for ‘Nebraska’ really came from Badlands, the Malick picture.”

https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/bruce-springsteen-gives-love-to-the-irishman-once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-as-he-makes-his-own-directorial-debut/

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part VIII

Filming for this extended scene took place in Smithville’s (Texas) downtown area. In addition to screenshots from the Criterion film, I included a few photos from my visit in March of 2019.

While much of the filming was done in Smithville, such as the O’Brien homes, neighborhoods and alley ways, and a relatively short restaurant scene, little of the downtown area was shown in the original version with the exception of Mrs. O’Brien walking with her boys on the sidewalk nearer to the end of the original film.

This scene was shot in downtown Smithville, Texas. You can see the First State Bank of Smithville, Texas on the building front in the background

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Version (2018) Part VI

This new film is by no means a standard “extended cut” in the tradition of which we’ve become familiar in trendy box sets of late. It is a “director’s cut” in the sense that the entire edit of this project was overseen by Malick, even featuring a brand new color correction by renowned DP Emmanuel Lubezki. But it feels reductive to refer to this version of the film as anything other than a new piece of work. Yes, it contains hours of the former version’s material, still meditating on much of the same scenarios, characters, and locations, but it feels imbued with a new, more muted palette, and an even closer intimacy with its subject matter, perhaps reflecting a filmmaker with different curiosities than the ones he held a over decade ago when Malick’s vision for the astral voyage was first conceived.

– Dom Nero of Esquire.com

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part V

Malick expands on young Jack’s (Hunter McCracken) relationship with one of the neighborhood boys — a background character in the original version — and his extremely troubled home life with a drunk mother (Robin Read) and violent father (Ben Chapin).

-Chris O’Falt of IndieWire.com

Malick expands on young Jack’s (Hunter McCracken) relationship with one of the neighborhood boys — a background character in the original version — and his extremely troubled home life with a drunk mother (Robin Read) and violent father (Ben Chapin).

-Chris O’Falt of IndieWire

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part IV

The add-ons around Jack give a deeper understanding to his recalcitrance, and new footage has him ending up at a private school far from home, lending his journey a more satisfying arc.

-Ed Gonzalez and Niles Schwartz of Slant Magazine

The hope becomes the troubled boy can find love, hope, and his path at boarding school, away from his father.

– Chris O’Falt of IndieWire.com

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part III

In a blisteringly exhilarating new sequence that fans of the film would really be remiss not to watch, a tornado descends upon the tranquil streets of Waco, Texas, and without Brad Pitt’s protective presence in the house (his character is off traveling the world on business affairs), the children and mother are helpless against the raw power of nature. This sequence calls to mind another new scene that’s plopped earlier into the edit, in which a group of baby birds sit on the lawn, completely defenseless out of their nest from high above.

– Dom Nero

In a blisteringly exhilarating new sequence that fans of the film would really be remiss not to watch, a tornado descends upon the tranquil streets of Waco, Texas, and without Brad Pitt’s protective presence in the house (his character is off traveling the world on business affairs), the children and mother are helpless against the raw power of nature. This sequence calls to mind another new scene that’s plopped earlier into the edit, in which a group of baby birds sit on the lawn, completely defenseless out of their nest from high above. And thus Malick’s thesis resonates again, clearer and louder here, as the roots of “the way of nature” and the “way of grace” grow ever-entangled, bringing full circle the haunting whispers from the film’s opening narration: “Father. Mother. Always you wrestle inside me. Always you will.”

BY DOM NERO SEP 19, 2018 for Esquire.com

In one sequence, Jack and his young brothers survey the destruction caused by a tornado. While this cut doesn’t feature any more of the awe-inspiring imagery created under the supervision of Dan Glass and his incredible special effects team, the power of nature is vividly evoked in this depiction of a disaster, the aftermath of which underscores the many ways the family lives at the mercy of a world evolving on its own almost inconceivably vast time scale.

By Benjamin MercerON FILM / FEATURES — SEP 28, 2018

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part II

We see glimpses of Mr. O’Brien’s deceased father, whose tragic end clearly shaped the man his son would become.

– Chris O’Falt of IndieWire

“With extra time spent with the family, the film has a bit more narrative shape, allowing us to delve further into the inner life of Mr. O’Brien (Pitt): We see recollections of his father, a door-to-door salesman who never got any respect from his employers and who died a sudden death.”

-Bilge Ebiri of Vulture.com

“We see glimpses of Mr. O’Brien’s deceased father, whose tragic end clearly shaped the man his son would become.”

– Chris O’Falt of IndieWire

Rare Screenshots from The Tree of Life Extended Cut (2018) Part I

Uncle Ray (Jack Hurst), the brother of Mrs. O’Brien, comes floating through town and, like his sister, has a lightness and joy with her sons and problems with their oppressive father. – Chris O’Falt of IndieWire

‘The Tree of Life’: Two Versions of Terrence Malick’s Masterpiece, Side by Side, and What Makes Them Different by Chris O’Falt (Sept. 11, 2018)(opens in a new tab)

“There are new characters, but they mostly appear for one scene or section of the film. Uncle Ray (Jack Hurst), the brother of Mrs. O’Brien, comes floating through town and, like his sister, has a lightness and joy with her sons and problems with their oppressive father.”

“Uncle Ray’s power to stand up to his brother-in-law is quickly belittled by the fact he hasn’t been able to find gainful employment. Jack, heartbroken by his uncle’s situation, tries to give his mother his meager savings.”

-Chris O’Falt of IndieWire.com

“One notable addition involves a visit from Jack’s uncle, Mrs. O’Brien’s brother, whom the kids adore and who seems to inspire their sense of play even as he tries to talk some sense into their dad about the way he disciplines his kids and treats his wife. Mr. O’Brien tells the younger man off, calling his brother-in-law an unemployable mooch and suggesting that the man has a nervous condition that has led to him being a failure at life.”

“It’s a fascinating glimpse not just into the dynamics of Jack’s family, but also into Mr. O’Brien’s ideas about what constitutes a responsible citizen. Nervous, sensitive souls and broken people have always been at the heart of Malick’s cinema, and the twisted dance between gritty outward machismo and a chaotic inner life has informed his aesthetic since the very beginning of his career.”

-Bilge Abiri of Vulture.com

The directors’ cut: filmmakers choose the best movies of the century so far – The Guardian

Richard Linklater

The Tree of Life (2011)

For its vast ambition and meditative grace. It somehow manages to be both an intimate memory film while taking on the notion of all of existence. And I love the way it confounds and challenges perception itself.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/sep/13/the-directors-cut-film-makers-choose-the-best-movies-of-the-century-so-far